Jeremy Lin and New York Knicks No Match Made in Heaven: Lin signs with Rockets

Like a shooting star Jeremy Lin landed into the laps of the New York Knicks bringing excitement back to Madison Square Garden. The Lin-sanity phenomenon took the entire country by storm and everyone from the avid sports fan to the unaware stay at home mom knew the story of the Harvard graduate who slept on his brother’s couch in the day and hit  game winners against Kobe Bryant and the Lakers at night.

However, just like a shooting star the Lin-sanity phenomenon quietly faded into the abyss, due to an injury to his knee Jeremy Lin sat out the rest of the season and missed the playoffs entirely. Despite his game winners and jaw dropping performances that can be viewed on youtube.com no New York Knicks fan will forget his decision not to suit up in the first round of the playoffs against the Miami Heat, after publicly admitting being at 85%. Although Lin’s decision to not play was a good business decision, I believe it was one of the main reasons why the New York Knicks declined to match the Houston Rockets $25 Million Offer Sheet.

Several pundits will say that the Knicks did not match the offer sheet because of the money, but when your billionaire owner, Jim Dolan gives you a blank check its then necessary to consider another reason. In order to play in the NBA it requires a certain amount of toughness, to play through pain, ignore injuries, and ultimately sacrifice your body for the sake of your team.

As the NBA regular season comes to a close there are no players at 100% but despite their ailments they continued to press onward, delaying surgery and recovery dates until their season has ended either in the regular season or after the playoffs. For example, Dwayne Wade was clearly operating at less than capacity but never reported the obvious choosing to wait until after he won his second NBA Championship with the Miami Heat.

In order to have SUSTAINED success in the NBA toughness is required, and Lin’s decision to not play during the playoffs clearly did not sit well with his former Knicks teammates who initially rallied around the Lin. Carmelo Anthony called Lin’s $25 million offer sheet ridiculous and JR Smith said that Lin’s contract would cause division in the locker room. These do not appear to be ringing endorsements but appear to the voices of angry and frustrated teammates, who played through their own ailments and injuries without excuse, unlike Lin who chose to wear a suit when his teammates could have used him on the floor.

At the end of the day the New York Knicks honored Jeremy Lin’s business decision with a decision of their own. Although a promising future as the Houston Rockets premier player awaits him I believe the Knicks got him Lin at his peak.With his tendencies now known and his toughness questioned everyone will be intrigued to see if Lin-sanity returns in Houston or disappears like a fading star into the dark night. Stay tuned… I know I will – A. Denmark (@eatdrnkslpsprtz)

7 thoughts on “Jeremy Lin and New York Knicks No Match Made in Heaven: Lin signs with Rockets

  1. Great post. The Knicks were in a tough spot especially after what had been said out in public by players. It’s going to be really interesting to see how Lin does in Houston and what the subsequent reaction will be in New York among the fans. We all know the Asian contingent isn’t happy about this but if Lin doesn’t play great I wonder what they’ll be saying. Another fantastic story for another story-line filled season. Also, could you please take a look at my blog cuz I really wanna know what you think http://chrisross91.wordpress.com/2012/07/18/no-lin-situation/

  2. this is one of the worst articles ever written regarding lin.

    luckily for you, lin decided to fire back at the liars / suckers who fell for stephen a’s usuall b.s. with a candid sports illustrated interview that dispells the 85% myth, and that all vets on the team rallied with him to sit out. another interesting factoid: the knicks made no offer and hung him out to dry, even contacting his agents to trade him by the february deadline. some loyalty, huh, knicks?

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/basketball/nba/07/18/jeremy-lin-exclusive/index.html

    now, let’s see “a. denmark” has the courage to admit he was dead wrong.

    • First let me thank you for your comment I truly feel your passion. I have yet to listen to Stephen A. Smith rant but you must admit it is a bit disconcerting that the franchise who has seen the most of Lin chose not to sign him and was willing to trade him at the trade deadline. The comments made by his former teammates also give reason for concern, it sure were not the words of Lin supporters. Do you? The Knicks are finally making wise business decisions by preparing for the future and not obsessing about the present. They made those mistakes with Jerome James, and Eddy Curry. By turning the page of Linsanity, the Knicks officially enter the Chris Paul sweepstakes next off-season. Now, I ask you, who would you rather have at the point Chris Paul or Jeremy Lin? – Again thanks for the comment. Hit me up on twitter @eatdrnkslpsprtz if you want to continue our dialogue at a faster pace

  3. I had a long response typed until an internet connection issue decided to wipe it clean.

    i’ll summarize my points again briefly using ESPN’s frontpage article:
    http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/8180308/nba-jeremy-lin-six-degrees-separation-family

    It’s not disconcerting to me that Lin wasn’t even offered a contract by the Knicks. Not when you account for Melo’s and JR Smith’s jealousy, and CAA, which are spelled out nicely in all 6 parts of that ESPN article.

    If you haven’t read/heard of Stephen A’s lying and slanderous rants portraying Lin as a traitor (nothing could be further from the truth, as you’ve discovered in the SI article), then I assume you read similar reports from the NY daily news/NY post, both known to be filled with hack journalists such as Isola. They’ve all been served a nice plate of crow with the SI article, I’d say.

    Also fun to note: Stephen A is a proven racist who was fired by ESPN for his racist rant against Babe Ruth several years ago. It is just another layer on why he and CAA were out to continuously smear Lin as a traitor. Over the past week, even Chris Rock was noting Lin was receiving criticism for his contract on the sole basis of his ethnicity (check Rock’s twitter postings). When George Hill received the same amount as Lin per year (40 mill over 5 years, and was outplayed by Lin incidentally in their matchups), not a single NBA player said one word. Not one word.

    I agree with you on Chris Paul, as he is part of CAA and great friends with Melo. You can pretty much bank on Paul being in a NY uniform by 2013.

  4. I agree with you that the Knicks finally didn’t let themselves fall prey to the temptation to match Houston’s over priced offer sheet. As for Lin, I believe you’ll see a different player next season as you have to remember that Lin will have no one to dish the ball to in Houston. Except for Kevin Martin and some rookies. There is no Lowry or Dragic or any marquis players left. It’s a decimated team, going nowhere, with Lin as the second highest paid player on their team.
    Felton, if he can return to his form from 2 seasons ago when he was last with the Knick, is serviceable enough to get the Knicks by until it’s CPIII time.
    Great article!
    -Hank
    Fantasy Furnace

  5. final post from me, though you probably won’t allow this to reach the comments section for all to view:

    http://espn.go.com/new-york/nba/story/_/id/8182481/ian-oconnor-blame-carmelo-anthony-loss-jeremy-lin

    “Melo didn’t want Lin back, I do know that,” said one source who has extensive dealings with the Knicks and their players. “Everybody in that locker room wanted Lin back except Melo and J.R. Smith.

    and another ESPN writer pointing out how melo/jr/stephen A and CAA would never allow Lin to steal the spotlight from melo again:

    http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/8180308/nba-jeremy-lin-six-degrees-separation-family

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